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The Zero Theorem. Starring Christoph Waltz and Melanie Thierry. Directed byTerry Gilliam. Running time: 106 minutes. MPAA rating: R. Available on iTunes and Amazon Instant Video.

The sickly neon lighting, the relentless Dutch angles, the grab-bag mix of futuristic and steampunk design, the theme of escape from bureaucratic control through fantasy: these are all excellent indicators that you're watching a Terry Gilliam film, and his new one, The Zero Theorem, is the Terry Gilliamest piece in his portfolio in quite a while. I wish I could say that I mean that as a compliment, but Gilliam's flaws may be inseparable from his strengths: when he's on, he's brilliant, but when he whiffs, the bleak swooshing sound is deafening, and The Zero Theorem, despite my fervent desire to claim otherwise, is one whiff after another. The surprise here is that most of the ground Gilliam covers here, he already trod devilishly well in Brazil, and after a while I wondered why he didn't know that. He's said he considers this film the third in a dystopian trilogy begun by Brazil and continued in 12 Monkeys, but it plays like a Gilliam imitator's crude remix of the two.

Christoph Waltz, bald and charmless, is the obsessive computer geek Qohen Leth, who toils in a cubicle for the Management, personified by a white-haired eminence (Matt Damon, seemingly doing a Philip Seymour Hoffman turn). Qohen is given the Zero Theorem assignment -- he has to prove that everything in the universe adds up to nothing. "Zero must equal 100%," we're told by machines again and again. This nihilist math/philosophy problem has broken many other thinkers, and Qohen, who refers to himself as "we" and has the prerequisite collection of genius quirks, finds himself dangerously distracted by blonde femme fatale Bainsley (Melanie Thierry), who may have been sent by Management to test his resolve or sabotage his efforts.

Pat Rushin's script plays as if Rushin fell asleep during a Gilliam marathon, woke up, and cobbled together a screenplay from what he dimly remembered. What's missing is any emotional charge, any urgency -- what William Goldman once called "the pregnant moment," the reason the story is being told now. Qohen is a passive character obsessed with a phone call he once missed, a phone call he thinks could have revealed his purpose in life. Aside from that, he works on the theorem and he dallies in virtual reality with Bainsley. Much of The Zero Theorem is a two-character play, spiced up by Gilliam's Dutch angles and colors that snap, crackle and pop. One dialogue scene, between Qohen and Bainsley in the cluttered former monastery he calls home, dribbles on and on; Gilliam seems to have forgotten that editing is part of the art of cinema, the thing that moves the images and the story.

Tedium sets in fast. Gilliam makes the surroundings as candied as he can, with Satire 101 messages running across digital billboards. The Management controls everything, but except for a Mutt and Jeff team of a heavy and his dwarf companion (ah, Gilliam and his dwarves), the Management doesn't have much of a menacing presence, or a presence at all, really. Qohen stays inside for months grinding away on the theorem, occasionally resisting cybertherapy from Dr. Shrink-Rom (Tilda Swinton) and sharing irascible dialogue with the Management's son (Lucas Hedges), a prodigious hacker who calls everyone Bob. Little of this has any dramatic interest; it's full of bits of sour whimsy, which we're meant to take as a hip, cynical vision of bland, hellish tomorrow (and tomorrow in this sort of dystopian satire is always today with futuristic trimmings).

One wants to root for Gilliam and his stubbornly uncommercial work, especially if we've enjoyed much of his earlier movies. I get no pleasure from swatting a new Gilliam film -- there aren't going to be very many more, he's not getting any younger, and he has a hell of a time getting these oddball things financed as it is. A salute, then, to Gilliam for staying true to himself, not even knowing how to sell out. But the irony of The Zero Theorem is that it's a parable about finding meaning in life, but it doesn't mean much itself. It's a doodle, a riff on Gilliam's pet themes, but emotionally and dramatically it's an inverse of the theorem: 100% of it equals zero.



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