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Let's Be Cops. Starring Jake Johnson and Damon Wayans Jr. Directed by Luke Greenfield. Running time: 104 minutes. MPAA rating: R.

Given what's unfolding in Ferguson, Missouri as I write this, a comedy called Let's Be Cops seems hideously ill-timed, at least if you go by the advertising. The premise put forth in the ads is simple: a couple of schmoes pass themselves off as policemen, get off on the privilege and power of their new position, and get into all kinds of slapstick debauchery. The actual movie, though, gets all of that stuff -- which, if the script went into it deeply and sharply enough, could actually threaten to be subversive satire -- out of the way fairly early, clearing the way for an idiotic and dull farce pitting our faux heroes (Jake Johnson, Damon Wayans Jr.) against mobsters of possibly Russian, or vaguely Slavic, origin. See, they pretend to be cops and then have to step up and actually do what cops are supposed to do! Get it?

I can't adequately express how soul-sucking the crime subplot is here. The crime subplot has derailed many a promising comedy; I wished, for instance, when sitting through Date Night that the movie would forget about its mobster storyline and just let Steve Carell and Tina Fey riff and improvise. By the same token, Jake Johnson and Damon Wayans Jr. are amusing enough when simply roaming Los Angeles in their fake cruiser, so why not let them? The desperately tired plot, which also involves a corrupt detective (Andy Garcia, in and out in about three scenes), just leads to uninspired shoot-outs so routine that they might as well be abstract color and movement for all the emotional impact they pack.

Wayans' character works at a videogame company, and his big idea for a game puts the player in the shoes of a purportedly realistic patrolman having supposedly realistic adventures. The game actually looks like every other escapist first-person-shooter game, and so does the police action in the movie. Let's Be Cops would have some point, some satirical juice, if it set up its two idiot protagonists as wannabe-cops based on what they imagine police work is from all the movies they've seen, and then harshly showed them what actual police work entails -- going into scenes of very human despair and squalor. But that wouldn't make for a rowdy Saturday-night farce -- not that the movie ends up being one anyway, since it pulls its punches while remaining squarely sexist, racist and homophobic, and not even in transgressive ways that might be cleansing and redemptive, just lazily status-quo.

It's something, I guess, for the black guy to take up with a white girl (Nina Dobrev, not allowed to show a fraction of what Vampire Diaries fans know she can do) and have it be no big deal. Some things are changing. And I liked how she's allowed to contribute to the heroics by plying her trade -- she's an aspiring make-up artist -- to make Wayans look like one of the mobsters' scary couriers. (The courier he's made up to look like is played, with welcome idiosyncrasy and improvisational flavor, by Keegan-Michael Key.) We don't have to look at the head mobster (James D'Arcy) holding a gun to Dobrev's head until one fake cop or the other mans up and shoots him. That job -- the manning up, that is, not the Dobrev-menacing -- is left to actual cop Rob Riggle, most likely doomed to play miltary, cops, or other alpha-male stereotypes until some imaginative director rescues him.

That director certainly isn't Luke Greenfield, who acquits himself here with the same blandness and unfailing ability to miss the point (and the laugh) with which he directed The Girl Next Door ten years ago. The Girl Next Door was an R-rated movie about a porn star in which we never saw the porn star naked -- not that I'm pining for nudity, but a movie with raunchy subject matter would do best not to chicken out of it -- and Let's Be Cops never hits the delirious highs or revolting lows that a truly daring cop comedy could go for. No, it sticks to its witless, anti-comedy gangster plot, involving a generic Slavic community that Nina Dobrev's character doesn't seem to be a part of, even though the actress is Bulgarian and speaks the language fluently. But then this would have to be a movie that showed the slightest affinity for being culturally astute or for giving its actors something interesting to do.



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