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The Fly (1986). Starring Jeff Goldblum and Geena Davis. Directed by David Cronenberg. Running time: 94 minutes. MPAA rating: R.

It's hard to fathom that it's been decades since David Cronenberg was actually a horror-movie director. Yes, some of his films of recent years have had horrific elements -- say, 2014's Maps to the Stars -- but The Fly, released thirty years ago, represented Cronenberg's farewell to a certain type of sci-fi/horror movie he'd practically patented, the icky bio-horror film that treated bodily mutation not as a threat but as a source of fascination. Movies like Shivers, Rabid and The Brood were 101 courses; The Fly was Cronenberg's doctoral thesis, and it turned out to be the biggest hit he would ever have.

For a brief moment in the summer of 1986, the mass audience bought what Cronenberg was selling -- a doomed romance packaged as a dare-you-to-sit-through-it gross-out. The Fly was the perfect vehicle to introduce Cronenberg to the larger mainstream, which he then wasted no time alienating (Dead Ringers, Naked Lunch, M. Butterfly, Crash). Seth Brundle (Jeff Goldblum, never more charismatic) is the foxiest and most attractive of the Cronenberg avatars, a genius whose motion sickness has driven him to develop a means of teleportation. Seth shows his work to science reporter Veronica Quaife (Geena Davis in a sharp early performance), though it isn't quite ready for prime time -- the "telepod" has trouble with organic material like flesh.

Cronenberg readies us for the nausea to come when an early experiment involving a baboon goes haywire. The Fly goes incredibly fast -- Cronenberg's regular editor, Ronald Sanders, clips the scenes to a bleeding edge, and it's not long at all before Seth, jealous because his new lover Veronica still has contact with her old lover and magazine editor (John Getz), gets drunk and decides to teleport himself. Of course, a fly stows away for the ride, and when Seth is re-integrated in the other telepod, the molecular-genetic structure of the fly has fused with Seth's. He becomes Brundlefly, and he gains superhuman strength and speed before deteriorating into a lumpy, grotesque creature who has to vomit on his food to digest it. (Emetophobes are not among the movie's fans.)

Besides having a Fox-produced big-movie sheen -- and Howard Shore's most dramatic score this side of Lord of the Rings -- this may be Cronenberg's most emotionally accessible film, and it really only has the three characters, other than sidebar figures who drift into Seth's path briefly. It's fast, and it's also stripped down; you're out of there in less than ninety minutes, but by then, you might be ready to go. The Fly also marks the beginning of Cronenberg's second phase of films, the terribly sad meditations on the fragility of sanity (his next, Dead Ringers, is among the most depressing movies ever made). The movie follows Seth through the twin breakdowns of mind and body, and shakes out as a true, classical tragedy.

The tragedy wouldn't work nearly so well, of course, without Geena Davis convincing us that she still loves the man underneath the monstrosity, and without Jeff Goldblum persuading us the man is still there. Seth stays engaged with his own dissolution, more for his own scientific edification than for posterity. Cronenberg was right to keep Seth restlessly eloquent right up to the full transformation -- Seth crests on his own ersatz insights, like someone on a cocaine rush, and then collapses into rage and lust. The emotions as well as the intellect carry us through the gushers of goop. After The Fly, there was really nowhere else Cronenberg could take his body-horror obsessions. It's a remarkably economical distillation and commercial apotheosis of his pet themes, and it works brutally well in the realms of heartbreak and skin-crawl. It's a full package.



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