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Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (1986). Starring Michael Rooker and Tom Towles. Directed by John McNaughton. Running time: 83 minutes.

This week marks thirty years since the peerlessly grim Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer first saw the light of a projector (at the Chicago International Film Festival). All told, it was four years before the film found a distributor and got a proper release. This gory and disquieting horror-drama has now received a 4K restoration and will soon be re-released in theaters. It's already available on DVD and Blu-ray, of course, and whatever way you can see it, you should.

Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer has a creepy, city-after-dark overtone, an existential chill. It packs a true grindhouse whiff while staking its claim as art. There's a deep tension between content and context here; the movie shows you hyperbolically grotesque things, but often at a remove, with the camera tracking in or out. The tracking happens during the opening credits, when we see various (usually female) corpses left in the wake of the titular Henry (Michael Rooker). Whether we're pulling back to take in the entire scene of the crime or pushing in for a better look at a woman's ruined face, we're led to look at the carnage as a series of tableaux, as works of art out of time, suspended forever in death and by death.

After making one documentary, director/co-writer John McNaughton made his feature debut with Henry -- and directed nothing remotely like it in the three decades since. Despite a few genre pieces here and there (The Borrower is goofy fun), McNaughton has never worn the label of "horror director" well. Henry has more in common with Cassavetes than with Herschell Gordon Lewis, though the movie's purest demographic exists in a Venn diagram of fans of both directors. The movie is cold and bleak, shot in the bowels of Chicago at night or on sunless days, usually in godforsaken alleys or among dead-looking roadside flora, the kind of places where corpses can be hidden, sometimes maybe found, almost never cared about.

The motor of the minimalist plot involves Henry's roommate and "friend" Otis (Tom Towles) and Otis' visiting sister Becky (Tracy Arnold). Tracy grows sweet on Henry, who doesn't know quite what to do with her feelings. Otis has a thing for Becky, but also puts his hand on the thigh of a guy he's dealing weed to. Henry is a moral blank, but Otis is a true monster, sexually twisted, possibly by his tightly lidded homosexuality. When this pair invade a well-to-do family's home, even Henry, recording the whole atrocity on a camcorder, is appalled by what Otis does. It's as though proximity to Henry has unchained Otis' demons, and the demons make him giddy. Rooker has since, of course, gone on to many different types of roles, but Towles, I think, here bravely nuked any chance he would have of playing anything other than a slimeball (he died last year).

We need the existence of Otis in order to be able to relate to Henry at all; Henry's a killer, too, but an affectless one who never seems to enjoy it. He's gentlemanly towards Becky, and disgusted by Otis' incestuous/necrophiliac kinks, and that makes him the closest thing to a moral center the film offers -- yes, he's a moral blank, but he's not actively, gigglingly evil like Otis. Towles manages to make Otis more than a caricature of redneck rabies, and Rooker smolders implosively, hardly moving his lips as he pulls out painful bits of (contradicting) memories about his mother as though prying shards of glass out of his skin. I submit that the scene in which Becky and Henry sit around the table trading familial sex-horror stories is the entire movie in microcosm -- everything proceeds from this grim and grimy reality of mothers and fathers who want to scar their children sexually. Henry's murders involve the soul more than the body. That's what makes the movie more art than horror.



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